land rights

land rights

Large-scale partnerships with the private sector could undermine Africans’ land rights, drive inequality and damage the environment

After decades of underinvestment, governments in Africa are turning to partnerships with donor aid agencies and large companies or investors to develop the agriculture sector. But this so-called ‘mega’ public-private partnerships are unproven, risky and represent a dubious use of public funds to fight poverty and food insecurity. 

Hands of a farmer, holding corn

Moral Hazard

African governments are increasingly turning to partnerships with donors and multinational companies to stimulate investment in agriculture, after decades of neglect.

Rice Farmers in Minbu, Myanmar's central Dryzone, Photo: Hein Latt Aung/Oxfam

Delivering prosperity in Myanmar's dryzone

Modernization of Myanmar’s agricultural sector is, rightly, a priority. However, mechanization and large-scale agricultural investment is not the only option.

Sugar Rush

This paper sets out how one crop – sugar – has been driving large-scale land acquisitions and land conflicts at the expense of small-scale food producers and their families.

A new dawn for equitable growth in Myanmar?

A new wave of political reforms have set Myanmar on a road to unprecedented economic expansion, but without targeted policy efforts and regulation to level the playing field, the benefits o

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