Crisis in South Sudan

Kuir Mayem Atem, déplacée dans un camp au Soudan du Sud
Kuir Mayem Atem now lives in Mingkaman camp, after fleeing her home with her family. "I could only think about taking my children to safety.” Photo: Kieran Doherty/Oxfam

Nearly 4 million people remain in urgent need in South Sudan following the conflict that broke out in December 2013. Over 1.9 million people have fled their homes and are displaced within the country and over 479,000 have fled to neighboring countries. We have reached more than 360,000 people with life saving essentials, but we urgently need to reach more.

 

We are currently providing life-saving clean water, sanitation and emergency food security to those in need.

The situation

Since fighting between government troops and rebel forces erupted last year:

  • Over 1.9 million people have fled their homes and are now displaced within South Sudan.
  • More than 80,000 people have sought refuge at various UN compounds across the country. In Juba, 80 percent of displaced people are women and children.
  • More than 479,000 people have fled to neighboring countries, many of whom had to cross the Nile River on their way to Uganda, leaving everything they had behind and risking their lives.  

What Oxfam is doing

We've reached more than 360,000 people in South Sudan with emergency food, clean water and sanitation services. We are also distributing commodity vouchers, fuel efficient stoves and grinding mills to provide greater food security in some of the camps and carrying out public health promotion.

Oxfam in the region

We have a dedicated team to respond to emergencies across South Sudan. We focus on public health, livelihoods and emergency response combined with gender, diversity and conflict-sensitive programming, policy and advocacy work. We have been present in Southern Sudan since 1983, providing humanitarian aid to victims of conflict, drought and floods, as well as long-term development assistance to some of the most vulnerable communities.

Updated 16 December 2014.

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