Tagged: free healthcare

Press Release
A nurse at a hospital in Lilongwe, Malawi. Photo: Abbie Trayler-Smith/Oxfam

Health insurance programs, which are being promoted by some donor agencies and governments in developing countries, are excluding the poorest and most vulnerable people.

Press Release
Women in Khedlo village, India.

New evidence revealed by Oxfam shows that women in India are being exploited and facing serious health problems, due to under-investment in healthcare by the Indian government and the proliferation of private for-profit clinics.

Press Release
Saratu Ademu, a pregnant health worker, Ghana. Photo: Abbie Trayler-Smith/Panos

110 global civil society organizations from 40 countries have signed a letter to World Bank president Jim Kim asking him assist all people, especially the poorest and most vulnerable, to access health services.

Campaign article
Pontoon boat.

The Zambia general elections will be held on 20 September to elect a president and representatives to the National Assembly. Civil society organizations in Zambia have identified the elections as an opportunity to ensure key health issues are a priority during the upcoming elections.

Image gallery

Sierra Leone used to be the worst place in the world to give birth. On 28 April last year, the government of Sierra Leone took a huge step in the fight to reduce maternal and child deaths by making health care free for pregnant and lactating mothers and children under the age of five.

Press Release

A major health insurance scheme in Ghana that the World Bank is pushing as a success model for other developing countries is severely flawed and not working for most Ghanaians, according to a new report by international agency Oxfam and Ghanaian NGOs.

Image gallery

In 2008, Ghana made healthcare free for pregnant women, partly thanks to foreign aid money. These photos show how this has already helped hundreds of thousands of women – and what else aid can achieve.

Press Release
Nurse Melifa Mphasa, age 43, listens to the pregnant belly of patient Modeste in the labor ward at Bwalia 'Bottom' Hospital in Lilongwe, Malawi. Credit: Abbie Trayler-Smith/Oxfam

New York - Millions were thrown a lifeline at special session at the United Nations today, when world leaders unveiled a plan for free health care in poor countries.

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