Tagged: West Africa

Emergency Article
Rum Alabe, musician. Photo: Charlotte Wales/Oxfam

Oxfam received the support from a group of African activists, singers, writers and performers to raise awareness around the continuing food crisis that is now affecting the Sahel region. We hope to raise an additional $20 million in order to reach 1.8 million people.

Video
See video

Bamako. A brand new track recorded for Mali Music Unplugged -- a special performance from the Sahel with Afel Bocoum and Damon Albarn, to raise awareness of the Sahel food crisis.

Press Release
Damon Albarn and Afel Bocoum perform together in Bamako. Photo: Simon Phipps/Oxf

Last week, Malian singer and guitarist Afel Bocoum was joined in Mali by British musician Damon Albarn for a unique music project aimed at drawing international attention to the growing humanitarian crisis in Mali and to the regional food crisis in West and Central Africa.

Press Release
Upper East Region of Ghana has 1 doctor to every 1 million patients. Photo: Abbi

Incoming World Bank president Jim Yong Kim must step up efforts to assist developing countries threatened by the euro zone crisis fallout, international agency Oxfam said ahead of his first day on the job.

Press Release
Etta Brahim Senussi and her family, struggle to cope.Chad. Photo:Andy Hall/Oxfa

Donors attending Monday’s pledging conference in Brussels must address a massive funding shortfall – over $900 million - on work needed to tackle the food crisis in the Sahel.

Video
See video

In the Sahel region of West Africa, families are facing a grim reality. A food crisis is now threatening more than 18 miillion people. Without help they won't get enough to eat.

Press Release
Aldaoula Banounassane cooks their first meal in 3 days. Photo: Fatoumata Diabate

The current food crisis in Niger is likely to escalate into a full-scale humanitarian emergency if urgent action is not taken, international agency Oxfam warned today. Already, 1.9 million people are at severe risk, and by April, this number could rise to 3.5 million people if help doesn’t come now, according to the National Early Warning System.

Syndicate content