Tagged: access to medicines

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Would you take your child to a quack doctor for treatment? Find out why public health services are desperately needed in India. Watch our video.

Policy Paper
Press Release
People waiting to get registered at Motihari District Government Hospital in East Champaran, Bihar. With so few doctors employed to work in the public sector   of healthcare in India, this scene is typical. Credit: Ranjan Rahi

Rich country donors and the World Bank are wasting money and risking lives by continuing to push unproven and discredited private healthcare programs in poor countries. Oxfam’s warning comes in a new report ‘Blind Optimism: Challenging the myths about private health care in poor countries’.

Campaign article
This is the reality of “private care” for many poor people. In India, 82% of outpatient care is provided by the private sector. Credit: Ranjan Rahi

Good healthcare is a fundamental right, not a luxury. But in poor countries, the growth of private sector provision means healthcare is often either too expensive, or such low quality it risks lives.

Campaign article
Oxfam trained health worker, Ilda Irune, in the local hospital in Machaze, Mozambique. Credit: Steve Simon/Oxfam

Oxfam is campaigning for healthcare for all, and is calling for developing country governments to build health services that can improve the wellbeing of people living with HIV.

Campaign article
An aids patient holding drugs provided through the Thai government treatment program. Credit: Tom Greenwood/Oxfam

Oxfam seeks to ensure that there is access to affordable ARV medicines worldwide to those who need them.

Campaign article
Oxfam trained health worker, Ilda Irune, in the local hospital in Machaze, Mozambique. Credit: Steve Simon/Oxfam

Every day 3000 people die from HIV/AIDS related illnesses. The HIV pandemic can be beaten – but it takes the will and action of governments around the world.

Press Release

Aggressive patenting costs lives, says Oxfam. Legal maneuvering by multinational companies restricting access to essential medicines contradicts their encouraging words at the International AIDS Conference.

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