Health and Education

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Mali has the highest percentage of people living below the poverty line in any country in the world. Ninety percent of Malians survive on less than two dollars a day. Credit Ami Vitale/Oxfam

Working for the Few

Almost half of the world’s wealth is now owned by just one percent of the population, and seven out of ten people live in countries where economic inequality has increased in the last 30 years.

Universal Health Coverage (UHC) needs to be truly equitable and universal

Oxfam applauds the World Bank’s continuing leadership on Universal Health Coverage and their ongoing collaboration with the World Health Organization, which increasingly highlights inequity as the crux of the problem. However, we caution against ongoing promotion of an ever-increasing role for for-profit companies in delivering health care in poor countries.

Photo: Abbie Trayler-Smith/Panos
English

Held to Account

Unaccountable government is a substantial obstacle to development.

Universal Health Coverage

Universal Health Coverage has risen to the top of the global health agenda. At its core, Universal Health Coverage is about the right to health.

What happened to the human right to education?

Today, Oxfam joined fifteen other leading civil society organizations to call for the right to education to be recognized and placed at the heart of the post-2015 development framework by member states of the United Nations.

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