Global meeting to define the future of development: What will be Mexico's legacy?

“In a world where 2.4 billion people live on less than $2 a day, there is an urgent need for the Global Partnership to deliver on its promise. ”
Carlos Zarco
Executive Director of Oxfam Mexico
Published: 14 April 2014

As development leaders from around the world gather in Mexico City to participate in the first High Level Meeting of the Global Partnership for Effective Development Cooperation this week, Oxfam is asking a crucial question: What will be Mexico’s legacy?

“The legacy of Busan was to bring us all together. But the billions of children, women and men who live in poverty are expecting much more from us than just sitting at the same table” said Carlos Zarco, Executive Director of Oxfam Mexico. “We are hoping Mexico will be remembered by the global community as the moment when governments, civil society organizations and the private sector took a big step forward and agreed on concrete ways to achieve greater results in the fight against poverty.“

In a world where 2.4 billion people live on less than $2 a day and almost half the world’s wealth is owned by just one percent of the population, there is an urgent need for the Global Partnership to deliver on its promise.

The monitoring report on progress since Busan shows poor performance and glosses over a disturbing trend. It provides more data on recipient countries’ use of funds than donor countries’ compliance with Busan commitments. This sets a double standard that undermines the legitimacy of the Global Partnership.

Many civil society organizations are also concerned that the voices and priorities of the poor are not being heard. “Inclusive development does not only mean having us all sitting at the same table. It means ensuring that every party’s contribution is valued and strengthened, in order to deliver concrete, measurable results.”

There is a lot riding on the outcome of this week. “Busan established the principle that people and their rights are central to effective development cooperation. Now the eyes of the world are turned to us. Will the Mexico HLM build on that foundation, holding us all to account for results that matter for people living in poverty?  The time to act is now” said Oxfam’s Carlos Zarco.

 

 

Notes to Editors

Oxfam will be tweeting live from the HLM:

Nicola McIvor, Policy Expert, Oxfam Great Britain: @njmcivor
Greg Adams, Policy Expert, Oxfam America : @gregory_adams_
Robert Fox, Executive Director, Oxfam Canada: @FoxOxfam
Carlos Zarco, Executive Director, Oxfam México : @carloszarco

Download the report: Busan in a Nutshell

Read the blog: Are international aid donors avoiding accountability for their Busan promises?

Contact Information

Mathieu Gagnon, Mexico cellphone: 044 55 11 50 43 37 mgagnon@intermonoxfam.org, https://twitter.com/gagnon_mat

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