As South Sudan peace talks are suspended, the fate of this young country hangs in the balance

In reaction to the suspension of South Sudan mediation talks in Addis Ababa, Oxfam’s Acting Country Director in South Sudan, David Crawford, said:

“As the third round of negotiations on South Sudan adjourns with no resolution in sight, the fate of the citizens of this young country hangs in the balance. Already over one million people have been displaced and are in dire need of humanitarian assistance including food, clean water and health care. With continued conflict and the impending rains, this number stands to rise dramatically.

“People will continue to be at severe risk until the conflict is resolved. In the interim, all parties must adhere to the commitments made through the signing of the Ceasefire Agreement and the Detainees Agreement. All must commit to a genuine and mutual solution, which includes civil society. The genuine engagement of South Sudanese people and their organizations in the peace process is not only necessary but should be prioritized.

“Oxfam reiterates that all parties to the negotiations have a duty to their citizens to return to the table in good faith and reach a swift and peaceful resolution to this conflict without further delay.”

Contact information: 

For more information or to arrange an interview with David Crawford please contact Aimee Brown on +254 731 859 413 or abrown@oxfam.org.uk

Notes to editors

Since the violence broke out on December 15, 2013, Oxfam has worked to meet the needs of the affected civilians. Currently, Oxfam is responding to emergency needs across three states: Upper Nile, Lakes and Central Equatoria. Oxfam also plans to support food distribution work in the remote areas of Jonglei State.

Overview of Oxfam's humanitarian response to the crisis in South Sudan.

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