Mosul civilians face humanitarian race against time

Failure to establish genuinely safe routes, prevent the use of explosive weapons in populated areas, and considerably scale up the humanitarian response could lead to catastrophic consequences for Mosul’s children and their families, as well as Iraq’s future.

Marriam travels from Sabir Mount to the city centre to sell bread and earn an income. Most of the city’s bakeries have closed.  Her grandchildren are reliant on her income after their parents died. Photo: Abdulnasser Al-Sedek/Oxfam

Picking up the pieces

Since March 2015, more than three million Yemenis have fled their homes, displaced by ongoing conflict. This paper sets out what they are facing and what governments, armed parties and agencies must do to help them get back on their feet and reduce the chance of an entrenched, long-lasting crisis.

A group of people wait in sub-zero temperatures to register at the Preševo centre. Photo credit: Pablo Tosco/Oxfam

Different conflict, same crisis

With more people fleeing violence and persecution now than at any time since records began, governments must make firm commitments at two major summits in New York to share their international responsibilities more equally, and to offer all refugees a safer future.


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