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As the cyclone and monsoon season approches in Bangladesh, Oxfam is working hard to provide emergency aid and help Rohingya refugee families prepare for a disaster. Credit: Maruf Hasan/Oxfam

Vulnerable Rohingya refugees living in makeshift camps in Bangladesh now face further disaster, as monsoon rains and possible cyclones will cause floods and landslides and increase the risk of deadly disease. Oxfam is ramping up its work to improve hygiene, sanitation and water delivery, and prepare families in the face of the expected storms. You can help.

Rasheda (24), a young mother-of-two, washes clothes in her yard, beside an open sewer, Chittagong, Bangladesh. Despite economic growth, almost 40 million people in Bangladesh still live below the national poverty line. Photo: GMB Akash/Oxfam

Our broken economy is widening the gap between rich and poor. It enables a small elite to accumulate vast wealth at the expense of hundreds of millions of people, often women, who are scraping a living on poverty pay and denied basic rights. Check it by the numbers and take action.

A child at a tap stand in Hassansham camp, Iraq. Credit: Tegid Cartwright/Oxfam

In rich countries, clean water is so plentiful and easily available that we simply take it for granted. Yet around the world, diseases from unsafe water kill more people each year than any other cause. Water is central to almost every aspect of Oxfam’s work. Find out more about these inequalities and what you can do about it.

One person in three in the world lives in poverty.

Oxfam is determined to change that world by mobilizing the power of people against poverty.

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Nashima Potawan, 47, and her four children were forced to move to Madalum during the Marawi Siege, and months later faced the devastating effects of Typhoon Vinta.

Last year, residents of Marawi in the Philippines faced two major disasters: In May, they were uprooted by a violent siege and seven months later, they faced a deadly typhoon. Oxfam is supporting a consortium of local organizations who are helping families stay healthy and safe in the wake of these crises, rebuild their lives and prepare for future disasters.

Workers peeling and sorting cashews in a cashew processing factory. From: Traidcraft Exchange

EU supermarkets abuse their huge purchasing power. Workers in developing countries suffer as a result. New legislation on unfair trading practices in the food supply chain proposed by the European Commission is a good start, but must go further to protect people in poverty.

What is GROW?

Almost a billion of us go to bed hungry every night. Not because there isn't enough, but because of the deep injustice in the way the system works. 

Besides, wild weather and unpredictable seasons are changing what farmers can grow and is making people hungry. Food prices are going up. Food quality is going down. Soon, climate change will affect what all of us can eat. For nearly a billion people in poverty, more extreme weather and more disasters mean more hunger.

Another future is possible, and we can build it together. Over the coming years, decisive action around the world could enable hundreds of millions more people to feed their families and prevent catastrophic climate change from destroying their (and our) futures.

Climate change. Poverty. Hunger. It’s all the same fight.