Lebanon

Lebanon

Syrian refugee children pose for a photograph for Oxfam's #withsyria campaign, Lebanon

Self-Protection and Coping Strategies of Refugees from Syria and Host Communities in Lebanon

This research project aimed to improve Oxfam’s understanding of the protection challenges faced by refugees from Syria as well as the protection concerns arising from the coping strategies that they use to try to meet those challenges, and the issues faced by host communities in Lebanon. The study also looks at the livelihood challenges and coping strategies that can give rise to protection issues, particularly for vulnerable refugee populations. 

Almost half of Syria’s population has been forced to flee their homes, including more than 4.5 million who are registered as refugees in neighboring countries. This video takes a look at what life as a refugee in Lebanon is like.

A family stand outside their temporary home in an informal settlement, Bekaa Valley, Lebanon

In Lebanon, Syrian refugees call for dignity and work

Lebanon is welcoming over 1 million Syrian refugees but is struggling to cope. Many refugees struggle to register in the country and cannot legally work. We are calling for urgent and immediate action to help alleviate their suffering.

Two Oxfam worker walk in Sawere, Bekaa Valley, Lebanon

Poverty, Inequality and Social Protection in Lebanon

The impact of the Syria crisis on Lebanon is immense and multidimensional. This report is the result of research by Oxfam and the American University, Beirut in an effort to gain a better insight into the lives and struggles of poor Lebanese households alongside Syrian and Palestinian refugee populations in Lebanon.

Refugee settlement in Anfie, north Lebanon, 2013. Photo: Sam Tarling/Oxfam

Lebanon looking ahead in times of crisis

Since the outbreak of the crisis in Syria in March 2011, Lebanon has felt the impact politically, socially and economically. More than four years into the crisis and with an all-out war on its doorstep, the country is experiencing ever greater repercussions.

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