health care

health care

Despite an impressive economic growth since 2005, poverty still affects millions of people’s lives in Kenya.

Taxing for a more equal Kenya: a five-point action plan to tackle inequality

Extreme inequality is out of control in Kenya. Less than 0.1% of the population (8,300 people) own more wealth than the bottom 99.9% (more than 44 million people). Tackling inequality could help to lift millions out of poverty, secure sustainable economic growth and bring the country together.

Oanh is a 27-year-old kidney dialysis patient who lives in Hanoi. Photo: Adam Patterson/Oxfam

Healthcare inequality in Vietnam: the price of a kidney

Oanh is a 27-year-old kidney dialysis patient who lives in Hanoi with her partner, Vinh. She and her family are locked in a cycle of debt to pay for the medicines she needs to take every day. Join her to demand an economy that works for everyone, not just the few. Sign our petition.

Rachel Oichoe, 9, attends class at Jaombi Foundation School, Kenya.

The case for a billionaire tax

Ending extreme inequality to end poverty has no lack of policy options: from corporate tax reform to investment in health and education, and from raising the minimum wage to ending gender discrimination. This discussion paper aims to put one of these solutions on the agenda: the billionaire tax.

One of many Ebola billboards in Freetown sharing prevention messages on how to stop the spread of Ebola

Ebola and the Private Sector

Ebola is a humanitarian crisis first and foremost – but it is also a mounting economic disaster for Guinea, Liberia, and Sierra Leone.

A Dangerous Diversion

The Lesotho health public–private partnership (PPP) has been described as opening a new era for private sector involvement in healthcare in Africa.

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