development

development

EU budget deal fails to deliver for most in need

The budget deal struck by EU governments, the European Parliament and the European Commission promises more funds for the EU’s external action, but diverts money from those most in need, warn development and humanitarian organizations.

Dust blows through a camp for IDPs in Bisle Siti zone. A devastating drought is causing the worst food crisis to hit Ethiopia in 30 years putting millions of people at risk of hunger and disease. Photo credit: Abbie Trayler-Smith/Oxfam

Climate Finance Shadow Report 2016

This briefing examines reported international public climate finance flows, taking into account the funding commitments of developed countries. Oxfam’s analysis finds that the most vulnerable people and communities are being neglected by funds that should be helping them.

A woman washes clothes at a drinking water source that is next to a toxic ash-pond from the Sasan project in Singrauli. Photo: Joe Athialy/Oxfam

Owning the outcomes

Over the past six years, the International Finance Corporation has channelled over $50bn to the financial sector. However, the evidence continues to grow that this private sector arm of the World Bank Group has little control over how a great deal of this money is spent.

Development aid more crucial than ever in era of SDGs

Increasing aid and making it more effective can help poor people become more politically active in decisions that affect them, while also supporting governments to become more accountable and plot their own path to achieving the Sustainable Development Goals.

Ganga Poudel, a member of the Pavrita Co-operative, carries foilage cut from a tree nearby her home to feed livestock. Photo credit: Aubrey Wade

Europe must lead by example on sustainable development

Oxfam, together with a coalition of development NGOs, calls on European Commission president Jean-Claude Juncker to make Europe become a leader on the global agenda for development and the fight against poverty.

Investor announcements are one step towards ending tainted Agua Zarca project

The Dutch Development Finance Company (FMO) and Finland’s Finnfund, two of the development banks backing the Agua Zarca hydroelectric project in Honduras, yesterday announced they would seek an exit to their involvement in the project. Today’s announcements are important in bringing us one step closer to finally shutting down the tainted Agua Zarca project.

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