poverty

poverty

Cocoa farmers in Nigeria

Inequality in Nigeria: exploring the drivers

This report provides a picture of the current state of poverty and economic inequality in Nigeria, identifies the main drivers of this situation and presents some policy solutions.

A young street vendor selling candy in Lagos, Nigeria. Photo: Mies van der Putte/Oxfam

Nigeria: extreme inequality in numbers

Economic inequality in Nigeria has reached extreme levels, despite being the largest economy in Africa. The country has an expanding economy with abundant human capital and the economic potential to lift millions out of poverty.  What makes Nigeria so unequal and how big is this inequality gap? Find it out and take action.

16 year old Eba'a Hamouda is one of the young people in Gaza being helped by Oxfam's partner, the Culture and Free Thought Association (CFTA). Photo: Oxfam

Failing Gaza: undrinkable water, no access to toilets and little hope on the horizon

Palestinians in Gaza remember a time when almost everyone could drink clean water from the tap. Now less than four percent of fresh water is drinkable and the surrounding sea is polluted by sewage. Yet the international community is failing to do enough to protect the health and dignity of almost 2 million people who have nowhere else to go. Read the story.

Hoan works in a farment factory in North Vietnam, where she works on average 62 hours each week, earning around $1 an hour.

Why the majority of the world’s poor are women

Despite some important progress in recent years, in no country have women achieved economic equality with men, and women are still more likely than men to live in poverty. Gender inequality in work costs women in developing countries $9 trillion a year – a sum which would provide a massive boost to the global economy.

Domestic workers are able to gain access to education, training and better opportunities for their careers through the National Advocacy Network of the Domestic Workers or Jaringan Advokasi Nasional Pekerja Rumah Tangga. Photo: Andi Cipta Asmawaty/Oxfam

Inequality in Indonesia: millions kept in poverty

In the past two decades, the gap between the richest and the rest in Indonesia has grown faster than in any other country in South-East Asia. What does this mean for ordinary people? Meet Maryam and Darmin, who are fighting for a better future for them and their families.

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