corporate tax dodging

corporate tax dodging

Reward work, not wealth

Dangerous, poorly paid work for the many is supporting extreme wealth for the few. Women are in the worst work, and almost all the super-rich are men. Governments must create a more equal society by prioritizing ordinary workers and small-scale food producers instead of the rich and powerful.

Despite an impressive economic growth since 2005, poverty still affects millions of people’s lives in Kenya.

Taxing for a more equal Kenya: a five-point action plan to tackle inequality

Extreme inequality is out of control in Kenya. Less than 0.1% of the population (8,300 people) own more wealth than the bottom 99.9% (more than 44 million people). Tackling inequality could help to lift millions out of poverty, secure sustainable economic growth and bring the country together.

While a minority of super-rich Kenyans are accumulating wealth and income, the fruits of economic growth are failing to trickle down to the poorest.

Kenya: extreme inequality in numbers

Despite an impressive economic growth since 2005, poverty still affects millions of people’s lives in Kenya. But extreme inequality is not inevitable, it is a matter of political choice. The Kenyan government can reduce it to sustainable levels and ensure a more equal and prosperous future for all Kenyans.

In the wake of the Panama Papers scandal in 2016, tax campaigners turned London's Trafalgar Square into a tropical tax haven, putting pressure on world leaders to take action on tax dodging. Photo: Andy Hall/Oxfam

Stopping the Scandals: five ways governments can end tax avoidance

When global corporations and the super-rich use tax havens to avoid paying their fair share, it is the poorest countries and people who lose most. This briefing lists five actions governments can take to tackle tax avoidance and end the era of tax havens.

father facing their poor village close to luxury apartments

Redefining inclusive growth in Asia

The last few decades have seen astonishing growth and poverty reduction across Asia, but inequality is on the rise. This paper sets out how APEC leaders can use the opportunity of the summit to move in a new direction – one in which the economy works for everyone, not just the few.

Rasheda (24), a young mother-of-two, washes clothes in her yard, beside an open sewer, Chittagong, Bangladesh. Despite economic growth, almost 40 million people in Bangladesh still live below the national poverty line. Photo: GMB Akash/Oxfam

5 shocking facts about extreme global inequality and how to even it up

Our broken economy is widening the gap between rich and poor. It enables a small elite to accumulate vast wealth at the expense of hundreds of millions of people, often women, who are scraping a living on poverty pay and denied basic rights. Check it by the numbers and take action.

Tax Battles: the dangerous global race to the bottom on corporate tax

Collecting tax is one of the key means by which governments are able to address poverty. But big business is dodging tax on an industrial scale. This report exposes the world’s worst corporate tax havens and calls on governments to work together to put a stop to this race to the bottom.

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