corporate tax dodging

corporate tax dodging

Hazardous to your health

Amid growing concern that the pharmaceutical industry’s pricing, tax and lobbying practices are undermining the health of millions of people in the US and across the globe, this briefing presents new findings on how the biggest corporate tax cut in a generation has benefited four of America’s pharmaceutical giants.
The world’s biggest pharmaceutical companies are cheating women and girls out of the chance to beat poverty.

Prescription for poverty

New Oxfam research shows that four pharmaceutical corporations – Abbott, Johnson & Johnson, Merck & Co (MSD), and Pfizer – systematically hide their profits in overseas tax havens. This activity could deprive developing countries of more than $100 million every year – money that is urgently needed to meet the health needs of people in these countries.

Reward work, not wealth

Dangerous, poorly paid work for the many is supporting extreme wealth for the few. Women are in the worst work, and almost all the super-rich are men. Governments must create a more equal society by prioritizing ordinary workers and small-scale food producers instead of the rich and powerful.

Despite an impressive economic growth since 2005, poverty still affects millions of people’s lives in Kenya.

Taxing for a more equal Kenya: a five-point action plan to tackle inequality

Extreme inequality is out of control in Kenya. Less than 0.1% of the population (8,300 people) own more wealth than the bottom 99.9% (more than 44 million people). Tackling inequality could help to lift millions out of poverty, secure sustainable economic growth and bring the country together.

While a minority of super-rich Kenyans are accumulating wealth and income, the fruits of economic growth are failing to trickle down to the poorest.

Kenya: extreme inequality in numbers

Despite an impressive economic growth since 2005, poverty still affects millions of people’s lives in Kenya. But extreme inequality is not inevitable, it is a matter of political choice. The Kenyan government can reduce it to sustainable levels and ensure a more equal and prosperous future for all Kenyans.

In the wake of the Panama Papers scandal in 2016, tax campaigners turned London's Trafalgar Square into a tropical tax haven, putting pressure on world leaders to take action on tax dodging. Photo: Andy Hall/Oxfam

Stopping the Scandals: five ways governments can end tax avoidance

When global corporations and the super-rich use tax havens to avoid paying their fair share, it is the poorest countries and people who lose most. This briefing lists five actions governments can take to tackle tax avoidance and end the era of tax havens.

father facing their poor village close to luxury apartments

Redefining inclusive growth in Asia

The last few decades have seen astonishing growth and poverty reduction across Asia, but inequality is on the rise. This paper sets out how APEC leaders can use the opportunity of the summit to move in a new direction – one in which the economy works for everyone, not just the few.

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