education

education

Judith teaches at a school in Equateur province, Democratic Republic of the Congo. The school director died of the Ebola virus and Judith was quarantined for 21 days as a precaution. Photo: Alain Nking/Oxfam.

Public good or private wealth?

We need to transform our economies to deliver universal health, education and other public services. To make this possible, the richest people and corporations should pay their fair share of tax. This will drive a dramatic reduction in the gap between rich and poor and between women and men.

World Bank must stop push to expand private education

The World Bank continues to steadily increase support for privatized education in lower-income countries despite mounting evidence that this approach is freezing out poorer children – especially girls – and doesn’t improve education quality. Oxfam’s new report "False Promises" says the Bank should immediately stop promoting Public Private Partnerships (PPPs) that expand private education.
Secondary students take their lessons at a PPP school in western Uganda. Credit: Initiative for Economic and Social Rights (ISER).

False promises

A growing body of evidence shows that education public-private partnerships (PPPs) which support private schooling are too often failing the most vulnerable children and risk deepening inequality. Despite this, the World Bank has been increasingly promoting education PPPs in poor countries through its lending and advice.
Sulemana is a teacher in Ghana. “When I came to this community as a teacher, I realized parents don’t want to bring their children – especially the girls – to school, she says. They believe that a girl belongs in the kitchen.” Photo: Jacob Stærk

The public service heroes who know the true cost of inequality

A decent education or quality healthcare is a luxury only the rich can afford in too many countries. Across the globe 262 million children are out of school. 10,000 people die every day because they can’t access healthcare. Teachers and public health care workers like Nellie and Dorra dedicate their life to great public services that benefit the poorest. And fight inequality every day.
Laxmi Thapa, of Kanchanpur, works in a sand and gravel mine to  make a  small  income. Photo: Oxfam

Fighting inequality in Nepal: the road to prosperity

Today, more than 8.1 million Nepalis live in poverty. To build a more equal country that leaves nobody behind, Nepal must act now to put the right policies in place, and enable citizens and social movements to advocate for progressive change and hold decision makers to account.
The financial district of Dhaka, Bangladesh. Despite economic growth, almost 40 million people in Bangladesh still live below the national poverty line. Photo: GMB Akrash/Oxfam

The Commitment to Reducing Inequality Index 2018

In 2015, the leaders of 193 governments promised to reduce inequality under Goal 10 of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). This second edition of the Commitment to Reducing Inequality (CRI) Index is based on a new database of indicators, now covering 157 countries, which measures government action on social spending, tax and labour rights – three areas found to be critical to reducing the inequality gap.

Building a more equal Ghana

Oxfam estimates that just one of the richest men in Ghana earns from his wealth more in a month than one of the poorest women could earn in 1,000 years. In this report, we call on the government of Ghana to use public spending to reduce inequality and put women’s economic empowerment at the heart of policymaking.  

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