extreme inequality

extreme inequality

The Shining Mothers from Kenya are doing their bit to demand an economy that works for everyone, not just the few.

An economy for the 99%

New estimates show that just eight men own the same wealth as the poorest half of the world. As growth benefits the richest, the rest of society – especially the poorest – suffers. Our economy must stop excessively rewarding those at the top and start working for all people.

A young student at a school in Santa Cruz Estelí, Nicaragua. Photo: William Vest-Lillesoe

The power of education to fight inequality

This report shows the unparalleled power of public education to tackle growing inequality and bring us closer together. To achieve this, education must be both of good quality and equitable; it should be free, universal and adequately funded.

A tale of two continents: fighting inequality in Africa

Despite the recent spate of economic growth, Africa remains afflicted by entrenched poverty and alarmingly high and rising inequality. This paper uses the Reducing Inequality Index (CRI) developed by Oxfam and Development Finance to produce a ranking of African countries on their policies to reduce the gap between rich and poor.
Northern Ghana has poverty levels two to three times higher than the national average. The region is covered by dry savannah land and lacks key infrastructure such as roads and markets. Photo: Adam Patterson/Oxfam

West Africa: extreme inequality in numbers

Despite an impressive economic growth, inequality has reached extreme levels in the West Africa region. The rich have grown richer while the poor have become even poorer. Yet the West African governments are the least committed to reducing inequality of any on the continent. Find out more and take action.

The West Africa inequality crisis

Oxfam’s Commitment to Reducing Inequality (CRI) Index shows that governments in West Africa are the least committed to reducing inequality of any on the continent. If they do not radically increase their commitment to reducing inequality, the crisis is likely to worsen.
Fatoumata lives in Burkina Faso. She is a cattle rancher and milk producer. Every day she travels 20km to Bobo to sell her milk and milk produced by the other families in her community. Photo: Pablo Tasco/Oxfam

Sahel: fighting inequality to respond to development and security challenges

Despite its development potential, the Sahel faces an unprecedented crisis. Today, there is a multifaceted predicament on top of the pre-existing development challenges that the region has been tackling. The governments of the Sahelian countries and the international community must respond to these urgent problems, making the fight against inequality a top priority.

Oxfam Position paper on IDA19 replenishment

This paper outlines Oxfam’s position on the 19th Replenishment of the International Development Association (IDA19), the World Bank’s fund for the poorest countries. It calls on donors for a strong replenishment, and with that financial commitment, to agree on a strong programmatic and policy agenda for IDA19 across the agreed upon special and cross-cutting themes.
Chhatiya is a young mother who lives in an urban slum in Patna in northeast India. With her husband they were forced into debt to pay private healthcare fees for their new-born son when the public clinic was unable to provide the care he needed.

India: extreme inequality in numbers

While India is one of the fastest growing economies in the world, it is also one of the most unequal countries. The richest have cornered a huge part of the wealth created while the poor are still struggling to earn a minimum wage and access quality education and healthcare services. Join our campaign and fight inequality today.

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