food prices

food prices

Cerignola (Foggia, Apulia region, Southern Italy), African immigrants working in the tomato fields ©Dino Fracchia/Alamy Stock Photo

The people behind the prices

This focused Human Rights Impact Assessment (HRIA) of SOK Corporation's Italian processed tomato supply chains is a pilot for the company's new approach to assessing human rights impacts in high risk supply chains that goes ‘beyond audits’.
Melati showing that the shrimp cocktail that served for european class society, coming from her sweat, sacrifice to stay in the unconvenient dorm, lower minimum wage.

Behind the seafood in our markets: stories of human suffering

The seafood industry is worth more than $150bn per year. But it comes at an unacceptable price: the suffering of the people who produce it. In Southeast Asia, workers describe the harsh conditions that are far too common in this industry. Stand with them and help us reveal what’s behind the price of food we eat.

 

About the campaign

Did you know that some fishermen in Southeast Asia report working at sea for up to 14 hours a day and 27 days a month, earning as little as $0.50 per hour?  Whether it is fished or farmed, sold in local markets or stocked on supermarket shelves, too much of the food we buy is produced at the expense of human welfare. Learn more and take action.

Marriam travels from Sabir Mount to the city centre to sell bread and earn an income. Most of the city’s bakeries have closed.  Her grandchildren are reliant on her income after their parents died. Photo: Abdulnasser Al-Sedek/Oxfam

Picking up the pieces

Since March 2015, more than three million Yemenis have fled their homes, displaced by ongoing conflict. This paper sets out what they are facing and what governments, armed parties and agencies must do to help them get back on their feet and reduce the chance of an entrenched, long-lasting crisis.

Nalukui is a farmer in Zambia. She harvested only 10kg of maize this year due to drought. Photo: Misozi Tembo

Making maize markets work for all in Southern Africa

In most of sub-Saharan Africa, maize is a staple food crop. This paper explores some of the reasons why maize markets fail and argues that a major reason is because there is so little trust or cooperation between governments and private traders.

Dutch beat French and Swiss to top Oxfam’s new global food table

The Netherlands is No. 1 in the world for having the most plentiful, nutritious, healthy and affordable diet, beating France and Switzerland into second place. Chad is last in 125th spot behind Ethiopia and Angola, according to a new food database by worldwide development organization Oxfam.

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