gender inequality

gender inequality

Reward work, not wealth

Dangerous, poorly paid work for the many is supporting extreme wealth for the few. Women are in the worst work, and almost all the super-rich are men. Governments must create a more equal society by prioritizing ordinary workers and small-scale food producers instead of the rich and powerful.

Garment workers at the workers rights training centre in Myanmar

Underpaid and Undervalued

Rising economic inequality across Asia is threatening poverty reduction and slowing down the fight against gender inequality. We believe that women’s economic empowerment is a critical factor in achieving gender equality and in supporting wider development goals

For many women and girls home is a dangerous place. The most common form of VAWG is intimate partner violence: globally, it is estimated that 30% of women experience this form of abuse.

Ten harmful beliefs that perpetuate violence against women and girls

One in three women will experience physical or sexual violence in her lifetime. Whilst there is no single cause for such violence, some of the strongest and most consistent factors are harmful social norms that contribute to gender inequality. Read more on these harmful beliefs and join us to say ‘Enough’ to violence against women and girls.
The financial district of Dhaka, Bangladesh. Despite economic growth, almost 40 million people in Bangladesh still live below the national poverty line. Photo: GMB Akrash/Oxfam

The Commitment to Reducing Inequality Index 2018

In 2015, the leaders of 193 governments promised to reduce inequality under Goal 10 of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). This second edition of the Commitment to Reducing Inequality (CRI) Index is based on a new database of indicators, now covering 157 countries, which measures government action on social spending, tax and labour rights – three areas found to be critical to reducing the inequality gap.

Building a more equal Ghana

Oxfam estimates that just one of the richest men in Ghana earns from his wealth more in a month than one of the poorest women could earn in 1,000 years. In this report, we call on the government of Ghana to use public spending to reduce inequality and put women’s economic empowerment at the heart of policymaking.  

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - gender inequality