gender inequality

gender inequality

Garment workers at the workers rights training centre in Myanmar

Underpaid and Undervalued

Rising economic inequality across Asia is threatening poverty reduction and slowing down the fight against gender inequality. We believe that women’s economic empowerment is a critical factor in achieving gender equality and in supporting wider development goals

In South Sudan, Oxfam trained producers in good cultivation, storage and marketing techniques. Elizabeth is now cultivating new vegetables. “With the money I make, I can send my children to school and pay for healthcare” she says. Photo: Tim Bierley/Oxfam

Empowering women farmers to end hunger and poverty

Women farmers play a central role in small-scale agriculture. But they are held back by barriers that prevent them from feeding their families and reinvesting in their livelihoods. A real support would protect their rights, boost their productivity and unleash their potential to fight hunger, poverty and climate change.

Since the end of April 2017, Yemen has been experiencing its worst recorded outbreak of suspected cholera in a single year.

Yemen: catastrophic cholera crisis

Since the end of April 2017, Yemen has been experiencing its worst recorded outbreak of suspected cholera in a single year. By mid-August, more than 500,000 cases were recorded. Significant and urgent scale up in all areas of intervention is needed.

Since joining the Tree Tomato Women's Cooperative Flonira has earned enough money to renovate her house, grow her own tree tomato plantation and send her son to China for his studies. In doing this she has broken perceptions of women in her community who are now valued and respected for their contributions to the household.

Mukeshimana Leocadie holds a pineapple outside Tuzamurane cooperative centre in Eastern Rwanda, Kirehe District where she is a member.

“Tuzamurane”: women pineapple farmers ‘lift one another up’ in Rwanda

Rwandan women head close to a third of agricultural households and provide almost two thirds of the labour on family farms. Despite this, they have very little control over the sale of cash crops. With the support of Oxfam, the women members of the Tuzamurane cooperative grow and sell pineapples together and are no longer trapped in a low income cycle.

Hoan works in a farment factory in North Vietnam, where she works on average 62 hours each week, earning around $1 an hour.

Why the majority of the world’s poor are women

Despite some important progress in recent years, in no country have women achieved economic equality with men, and women are still more likely than men to live in poverty. Gender inequality in work costs women in developing countries $9 trillion a year – a sum which would provide a massive boost to the global economy.

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