Syrian refugee crisis

Syrian refugee crisis

Batoul Taha, syrienne de 18 ans, vit à présent dans un appartement de Chicago avec sa mère, son père et ses deux frères. Photo : Coco McCabe/Oxfam Amérique

Where there’s a will, there’s a way: safe havens needed for refugees from Syria

Oxfam’s research shows that less than three percent of the Syrian refugee population have actually arrived in rich countries through resettlement programmes. By analysing resettlement policies and practices in eight key countries, this paper shows why resettling at least 10 percent of the refugee population from Syria is both necessary and possible.

A young girl flies a kite in Za'atari camp. Photo credit: Adeline Guerra/Oxfam

From words to action

The ‘Supporting Syria and the Region’ conference, held in London on 4 February 2016, has failed to deliver on the core issues of the protection of civilians inside Syria and of refugees in neighboring countries. This joint agency report sets out what needs to be done to make the commitments a reality.

Rich countries have resettled just 1.39% of Syrian refugees, need to step up efforts

Rich countries have resettled only 1.39 percent of the nearly five million Syrian refugees, a fraction of the 10 percent of people who need to be urgently offered a safe haven. As wealthy states meet in Geneva on 30 March to discuss the Syria refugee crisis, Oxfam urges them to redouble their efforts and offer their ‘fair share’ of support to hundreds of thousands of refugees.

A family stand outside their temporary home in an informal settlement, Bekaa Valley, Lebanon

In Lebanon, Syrian refugees call for dignity and work

Lebanon is welcoming over 1 million Syrian refugees but is struggling to cope. Many refugees struggle to register in the country and cannot legally work. We are calling for urgent and immediate action to help alleviate their suffering.

A doctor hold a new born baby, Za'atari Refugee Camp, Jordan

Life in Za’atari refugee camp, Jordan’s fourth biggest city

Za’atari refugee camp hosts around 80,000 Syrians who have been forced to flee the war in Syria. More than half of these refugees are children. The size of the camp, now Jordan’s fourth biggest city, is presenting huge challenges for infrastructure. 

Syrian children gather outside a school in Zaatari refugee camp in Jordan, on September 21, 2015. As a host country Jordan is estimated to spend $870 million a year supporting Syrian refugees. Photo: Sam Tarling/Oxfam

Right to a Future

With no end to the conflict in Syria in sight, the four million people forced to flee the country have no foreseeable prospect of safe return. And as the impact of the crisis on neighboring countries grows and aid dries up, the situation for these refugees is becoming increasingly dire. This briefing calls for a new approach by the international community.

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