drought

drought

A woman carries the basic materials to construct her house again at a new location. Pastoralists are resettling in the Garadag district after a 60km journey on a truck with their animals. Somaliland, March 2017. Photo: Petterik Wiggers/Oxfam

Drought, displacement and livelihoods in Somalia/Somaliland

Thousands of Somali families were displaced to urban centres by the 2017 drought. Research by a group of NGOs indicates that they do not intend to return home anytime soon. It also shows how precarious and limited are the livelihood opportunities for displaced people in Somalia.

Uprooted by climate change

Climate change is already forcing people from their land and homes, and putting many more at risk of displacement in the future. This paper describes the effects on communities and how responding to these growing realities demands far stronger action towards ending global climate pollution.

Hodan Abdi Mohammed, 45, has lost all of her six children and her husband during the drought in Somaliland. Photo: Petterik Wiggers/Oxfam

From early warning to early action in Somalia

More than three years after it was initiated in the aftermath of the 2011 famine, the early-warning, early-action trigger mechanism for Somalia remains a work in progress. This paper looks at how the mechanism has functioned during the 2016/7 drought crisis response.

A climate in crisis

There is growing scientific analysis suggesting that the impacts of current and recent droughts in East Africa are likely to have been aggravated by climate change. Without global efforts to reduce emissions and to help the world’s poorest people cope with the effects of climate change, this crisis will continue to repeat itself.

Drought in East Africa: “If the rains do not come, none of us will survive”

For many people in East Africa, the current drought is the worst in living memory. Nomadic pastoralists are among the hardest hit. Their livestock is completely wiped out, meaning they have no means to feed themselves. In eastern Somaliland, Oxfam witnessed entire communities on the move, desperately searching for water and pasture.

Dead sheep and goats, which died because of the continous drought situation in Somaliland. Photo: Petterik Wiggers/Oxfam

How climate change is helping fuel a massive hunger crisis in East Africa

Climate change is not a distant, future threat. Right now, it is helping fuel a massive crisis in the Horn of Africa region. Nearly 11 million people in Somalia, Ethiopia, and Kenya face terrifying food shortages, due to a catastrophic drought that has killed off crops and cattle. Urgent action is needed now.

Jenipher Nkotima, 24, used to be able to grow enough maize to feed her family but that the recent drought, exacerbated by climate change, means there hasn’t been enough food to go round. Photo: Eldson Chagara/Oxfam

The longest lean season

Although the El Niño weather event has ended, the humanitarian needs resulting from the drought in Southern Africa remain huge, and are still deepening.

We are learning how to manage our crops better,” say farmers Malvin Ortiz and Felipe Martínez, “and we are teaching our children how to do it, too.” Now, the future is looking more hopeful.

Building resilience to drought in El Salvador

The lingering effects of El Niño have affected around 7 million people in Latin America and the Caribbean. Oxfam and its local partners have been helping some of the most vulnerable people in the region to become more resilient to extreme weather patterns.

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