livelihoods

livelihoods

Nidhal, from Musahak village in Salah al-Din governorate, was forced to leave her home in October 2015 to escape life under ISIS. Photo: Charlotte Sawyer/Oxfam

‘I am determined to realize my dream’

This research report explores the decision making processes of displaced people and returnees in Salah al-Din governorate, Iraq. It finds that against a backdrop of strong family and community support, displaced people and returnees – including women – have surprising levels of agency and self-direction.
Melati showing that the shrimp cocktail that served for european class society, coming from her sweat, sacrifice to stay in the unconvenient dorm, lower minimum wage.

Behind the seafood in our markets: stories of human suffering

The seafood industry is worth more than $150bn per year. But it comes at an unacceptable price: the suffering of the people who produce it. In Southeast Asia, workers describe the harsh conditions that are far too common in this industry. Stand with them and help us reveal what’s behind the price of food we eat.

 

About the campaign

Did you know that some fishermen in Southeast Asia report working at sea for up to 14 hours a day and 27 days a month, earning as little as $0.50 per hour?  Whether it is fished or farmed, sold in local markets or stocked on supermarket shelves, too much of the food we buy is produced at the expense of human welfare. Learn more and take action.

The fighting must stop – to create a space for peace

On 13 June 2018, The Saudi- and UAE-led coalition launched an attack on Hodeida, Yemen’s lifeline port. One week on, the Coalition has ignored all warnings and combined forces have pressed ahead to take Hodeida airport. The advance must now stop and efforts be refocused on peace. Taking the battle to a densely-populated city will have a much higher humanitarian toll.

The world needs a new strategy to protect the people of Hodeida and avoid catastrophe

The Saudi - and UAE - led Coalition’s assault on Hodeida – Yemen’s lifeline port – threatens hundreds of thousands of civilians in that city, and around 20 million more who rely on its imports of food, fuel, medicine and other supplies. The strategy to prevent this assault through quiet diplomacy has failed. For the sake of millions of Yemenis, the time for a more effective strategy is now.

A children's play park sits between the neighbourhoods of Jabal Mohsen and Bab al Tabbaneh in Tripoli. Jabal Mohsen and Bab al Tabbaneh are among the most impoverished and neglected areas in Lebanon. Photo: Sam Tarling/Oxfam

Making aid work in Lebanon

Lebanon currently hosts the largest number of refugees per capita in the world. This paper urges donors and policy makers to ensure that new financing to Lebanon is rights-based, accountable to local populations, reflects local priorities and benefits the most vulnerable.

A displaced woman works with her sewing machine in an IDP camp in Damboa, Borno state, Nigeria. Photo: Tom Saater/Oxfam

Supporting livelihoods in the Lake Chad Basin

The protracted conflict in the Lake Chad Basin has cut off millions of women and men from their livelihoods, making them dependent on humanitarian assistance to survive. Oxfam’s research in late 2017 showed that early recovery and livelihoods development are much needed and should be prioritized to promote resilience among crisis-affected communities.

Mohammed (9) sitting in the entrance of a tent in the Huth IDP camp, Amran.

Yemen on the brink of famine

The number of people in need as a result of Yemen’s conflict continues to rise, but the international aid response has failed to keep up. Aid alone, however, cannot solve Yemen’s crisis. All sides and their international backers should stop the de-facto blockade and the conflict that are pushing Yemen towards famine.

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