public-private partnerships

public-private partnerships

World Bank must stop push to expand private education

The World Bank continues to steadily increase support for privatized education in lower-income countries despite mounting evidence that this approach is freezing out poorer children – especially girls – and doesn’t improve education quality. Oxfam’s new report "False Promises" says the Bank should immediately stop promoting Public Private Partnerships (PPPs) that expand private education.
Secondary students take their lessons at a PPP school in western Uganda. Credit: Initiative for Economic and Social Rights (ISER).

False promises

A growing body of evidence shows that education public-private partnerships (PPPs) which support private schooling are too often failing the most vulnerable children and risk deepening inequality. Despite this, the World Bank has been increasingly promoting education PPPs in poor countries through its lending and advice.

Large-scale partnerships with the private sector could undermine Africans’ land rights, drive inequality and damage the environment

After decades of underinvestment, governments in Africa are turning to partnerships with donor aid agencies and large companies or investors to develop the agriculture sector. But this so-called ‘mega’ public-private partnerships are unproven, risky and represent a dubious use of public funds to fight poverty and food insecurity. 

A Dangerous Diversion

The Lesotho health public–private partnership (PPP) has been described as opening a new era for private sector involvement in healthcare in Africa.

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