Ensuring that EU development cooperation and humanitarian aid works for people in need

Millions of people worldwide are affected by human rights violations, conflict and natural disasters, and even more need support to lift themselves out of poverty.

Millions of people worldwide are affected by human rights violations, conflict and natural disasters, and even more need support to lift themselves out of poverty. In recent years, the EU’s commitment to eradicating poverty, assisting people affected by crisis, and promoting sustainable development has been undermined by its short-sighted preoccupation with ‘tackling migration’ to Europe.

Other disturbing trends in EU foreign and development policy include the increased securitisation and privatisation of aid, and the initiation of trade partnerships that benefit elites and businesses in Europe rather than local communities in developing countries and crisis-affected contexts.

Prioritising human rights, sustainable development and the fight against inequality throughout the EU’s external action

The EU must change course and prioritise human rights, sustainable development and the fight against inequality in its entire external action agenda. It should focus on the countries and people most in need and enable people to shape the policies and actions that affect their lives, making those in power more responsive and accountable.

The EU should particularly support civil-society and human-rights defenders, especially women’s organisations and women human rights defenders. Women and girls have an essential role in building strong societies yet are at the greatest risk of discrimination, harassment and abuse.

New EU long-term budget crucial for Europe to stay a strong development actor

The current negotiations of the EU’s next long-term budget, the Multiannual Financial Framework (MFF), are crucial to defend strong and principled EU development aid. The EU must make sure its next budget delivers on ending poverty and reducing inequality. It should do so by supporting health, education, food security, sustainable agriculture, women’s empowerment and social protection, and by making sure to meet the actual needs of people in developing countries.

Upholding humanitarian principles over military and geopolitical objectives

In its humanitarian work, the EU must ensure that its interventions are guided only by humanitarian need and the vulnerabilities of those affected. The EU should uphold humanitarian principles and prevent military or geopolitical objectives overshadowing or breaching international humanitarian law.