private sector

private sector

The Dutch Good Growth Fund has supported rose farming in Ethiopia through blended finance. Photo: DGGF

Private-finance blending for development: risks and opportunities

Aid donors increasingly seek to inject private-sector resources into development by ‘blending’ official development assistance (ODA) with private finance. There is little evidence of the development impact, and projects often do not align with country ownership, transparency and accountability.

Port de Pointe-Noire in the Republic of the Congo (Brazzaville), supported by a €328m blended finance package. Photo: Congo Terminal Pointe-Noire.

Blended finance: what it is, how it works and how it is used

‘Blending’ combines official development assistance with other private or public resources, in order to ‘leverage’ additional funds from other actors. This report aims to clarify what it is, how it works and how it is used, to foster greater understanding of this increasingly prominent development finance mechanism.

An increase in agribusiness investments poses serious risks to the livelihoods of small-scale farmers and others dependent on land.

Whose crops, at what price? Agricultural investment in Myanmar

After years of international isolation, Myanmar is liberalizing its economy and seeking to attract foreign investment. This paper outlines potential risks to communities posed by these investments, and explores state regulation as a way to promote responsible business practices in the sector.

Fishermen in Kyauk Phyu. Photo: Kaung Htet

Responsible investment in Myanmar

This report draws on evidence from the South-East Asia region to explore the impacts of special economic zones (SEZs). It shows that without transparency and accountable governance, SEZs are more likely to result in harmful environmental and social impacts.

Line production worker holding pudding produced at the Al Jhaleej dairy factory in Gaza. Photo credit: Hussam Salem/Oxfam

The dairy sector in the Gaza Strip

Gaza's dairy sector has been severely damaged by Israel’s separation policy, blockade and three rounds of hostilities. However, there are opportunities for the sector to grow and reduce its dependence on external markets.

A woman washes clothes at a drinking water source that is next to a toxic ash-pond from the Sasan project in Singrauli. Photo: Joe Athialy/Oxfam

Owning the outcomes

Over the past six years, the International Finance Corporation has channelled over $50bn to the financial sector. However, the evidence continues to grow that this private sector arm of the World Bank Group has little control over how a great deal of this money is spent.

Beatrice, a small scale farmer in Ghana but is forced to make up her income by smashing rocks.

Feeding climate change

Despite progress, much work remains to cut greenhouse gas emissions and to support the millions of people already hit by climate change. This paper presents new data commissioned from the research consultancy CE Delft on the greenhouse gas emissions footprints and water scarcity footprints of major food commodities. 

 Yanacocha gold mine Mine, Cajamarca, Peru. Photo credit: Chris Hufstader / Oxfam America

The weak link

Extractive industries present potentially large opportunities for developing countries. Oxfam has produced a detailed study of the political economy of decision making, with research conducted in Peru, Ghana, Senegal and Tanzania.

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - private sector