essential services

essential services

Chhatiya is a young mother who lives in an urban slum in Patna in northeast India. With her husband they were forced into debt to pay private healthcare fees for their new-born son when the public clinic was unable to provide the care he needed.

India: extreme inequality in numbers

While India is one of the fastest growing economies in the world, it is also one of the most unequal countries. The richest have cornered a huge part of the wealth created while the poor are still struggling to earn a minimum wage and access quality education and healthcare services. Join our campaign and fight inequality today.
Sulemana is a teacher in Ghana. “When I came to this community as a teacher, I realized parents don’t want to bring their children – especially the girls – to school, she says. They believe that a girl belongs in the kitchen.” Photo: Jacob Stærk

The public service heroes who know the true cost of inequality

A decent education or quality healthcare is a luxury only the rich can afford in too many countries. Across the globe 262 million children are out of school. 10,000 people die every day because they can’t access healthcare. Teachers and public health care workers like Nellie and Dorra dedicate their life to great public services that benefit the poorest. And fight inequality every day.
Laxmi Thapa, of Kanchanpur, works in a sand and gravel mine to  make a  small  income. Photo: Oxfam

Fighting inequality in Nepal: the road to prosperity

Today, more than 8.1 million Nepalis live in poverty. To build a more equal country that leaves nobody behind, Nepal must act now to put the right policies in place, and enable citizens and social movements to advocate for progressive change and hold decision makers to account.
While a minority of super-rich Kenyans are accumulating wealth and income, the fruits of economic growth are failing to trickle down to the poorest. Photo: Allan Gichigi/Oxfam

Tax incentives in the global South

This joint briefing from Oxfam, Christian Aid, Action Aid and the CBI reflects a growing convergence between businesses and tax advocacy groups on the use of tax incentives in the Global South.  It argues that tax incentives can be a useful tool in promoting decent jobs and growth.  But it also contends that too often tax incentives are used in inefficient and ineffective ways, and in the worst cases are entirely redundant.  

Rachel Oichoe, 9, attends class at Jaombi Foundation School, Kenya.

The case for a billionaire tax

Ending extreme inequality to end poverty has no lack of policy options: from corporate tax reform to investment in health and education, and from raising the minimum wage to ending gender discrimination. This discussion paper aims to put one of these solutions on the agenda: the billionaire tax.

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