food supply chain

food supply chain

Cerignola (Foggia, Apulia region, Southern Italy), African immigrants working in the tomato fields ©Dino Fracchia/Alamy Stock Photo

The people behind the prices

This focused Human Rights Impact Assessment (HRIA) of SOK Corporation's Italian processed tomato supply chains is a pilot for the company's new approach to assessing human rights impacts in high risk supply chains that goes ‘beyond audits’.
For Theophile and Calinie, the adoption of sustainable farming practices has resulted in a dramatic increase in yields (50 to 250 kilogrammes of beans) and incomes to ensure a better quality of life for their children. Photo: Lisa Murray/Oxfam

A living income for small-scale farmers

The ability of small-scale farmers to earn a living income is critical to ensure their viability and economic success. This paper argues that closing the living income gap for small-scale farmers requires tackling the underlying imbalance in risk and market power that many of them face when engaging in global food value chains.
Melati showing that the shrimp cocktail that served for european class society, coming from her sweat, sacrifice to stay in the unconvenient dorm, lower minimum wage.

Behind the seafood in our markets: stories of human suffering

The seafood industry is worth more than $150bn per year. But it comes at an unacceptable price: the suffering of the people who produce it. In Southeast Asia, workers describe the harsh conditions that are far too common in this industry. Stand with them and help us reveal what’s behind the price of food we eat.

 

An Indonesian woman shrimp farmer with her child. Photo by Michael Glowacki.

Towards a socially responsible Aquaculture Stewardship Council

The Aquaculture Stewardship Council (ASC) is a certification initiative which aims to promote responsible aquaculture. Oxfam regards ASC as an initiative to transform the sector, but there is a need for urgent improvements on social aspects such as fair contracts for farmers, decent labor rights in the industry, and effective and transparent stakeholder consultation.

About the campaign

Did you know that some fishermen in Southeast Asia report working at sea for up to 14 hours a day and 27 days a month, earning as little as $0.50 per hour?  Whether it is fished or farmed, sold in local markets or stocked on supermarket shelves, too much of the food we buy is produced at the expense of human welfare. Learn more and take action.

Key step taken to end human suffering in EU supermarket supply chains

The European Commission has published a proposal on unfair trading practices in the EU food supply chain. Right now, supermarkets’ poor practices lead to insecurity among their suppliers, which directly impacts the most vulnerable people in the value chain. Oxfam and NGOs welcome this move, and call on the European Parliament and the Council to strengthen the Commission’s proposal.

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