food supply chain

food supply chain

A fruit worker under a mango tree. Photo: Tatiana Cardeal/Oxfam

Workers’ rights in supermarket supply chains

This Oxfam briefing note presents compelling new evidence that our food supply chains are rife with violations of human, labour and women’s rights. it summarises new research commissioned for Oxfam, which shows the depth and scale of human suffering in food production in India and Brazil linked to international supermarket supply chains.
A worker in Assam plucks tea leaves in the rain. Credit: Roanna Rahman/Oxfam

Addressing the human cost of Assam tea

Workers on tea plantations in the Assam region of India are systematically denied their rights to a living wage and decent working and living conditions. Oxfam’s new research shows that the solutions lie in a fairer sharing of the end consumer price of tea, stronger gender policies and a review of plantation labour laws to ensure that women and men in Assam can lead dignified lives.
Cerignola (Foggia, Apulia region, Southern Italy), African immigrants working in the tomato fields ©Dino Fracchia/Alamy Stock Photo

The people behind the prices

This focused Human Rights Impact Assessment (HRIA) of SOK Corporation's Italian processed tomato supply chains is a pilot for the company's new approach to assessing human rights impacts in high risk supply chains that goes ‘beyond audits’.
For Theophile and Calinie, the adoption of sustainable farming practices has resulted in a dramatic increase in yields (50 to 250 kilogrammes of beans) and incomes to ensure a better quality of life for their children. Photo: Lisa Murray/Oxfam

A living income for small-scale farmers

The ability of small-scale farmers to earn a living income is critical to ensure their viability and economic success. This paper argues that closing the living income gap for small-scale farmers requires tackling the underlying imbalance in risk and market power that many of them face when engaging in global food value chains.
Melati showing that the shrimp cocktail that served for european class society, coming from her sweat, sacrifice to stay in the unconvenient dorm, lower minimum wage.

Behind the seafood in our markets: stories of human suffering

The seafood industry is worth more than $150bn per year. But it comes at an unacceptable price: the suffering of the people who produce it. In Southeast Asia, workers describe the harsh conditions that are far too common in this industry. Stand with them and help us reveal what’s behind the price of food we eat.

 

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - food supply chain