accountability

accountability

World Bank must stop push to expand private education

The World Bank continues to steadily increase support for privatized education in lower-income countries despite mounting evidence that this approach is freezing out poorer children – especially girls – and doesn’t improve education quality. Oxfam’s new report "False Promises" says the Bank should immediately stop promoting Public Private Partnerships (PPPs) that expand private education.
Secondary students take their lessons at a PPP school in western Uganda. Credit: Initiative for Economic and Social Rights (ISER).

False promises

A growing body of evidence shows that education public-private partnerships (PPPs) which support private schooling are too often failing the most vulnerable children and risk deepening inequality. Despite this, the World Bank has been increasingly promoting education PPPs in poor countries through its lending and advice.

Walking the talk

Three years after the adoption of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), reliable information on how companies are working to contribute to the SDGs remains sparse. This paper uses five general themes (prioritization; integration; ambition; human rights and gender equality; and reporting) to review the SDG engagement of 76 of the world’s largest companies.
A children's play park sits between the neighbourhoods of Jabal Mohsen and Bab al Tabbaneh in Tripoli. Jabal Mohsen and Bab al Tabbaneh are among the most impoverished and neglected areas in Lebanon. Photo: Sam Tarling/Oxfam

Making aid work in Lebanon

Lebanon currently hosts the largest number of refugees per capita in the world. This paper urges donors and policy makers to ensure that new financing to Lebanon is rights-based, accountable to local populations, reflects local priorities and benefits the most vulnerable.

Hodan Abdi Mohammed, 45, has lost all of her six children and her husband during the drought in Somaliland. Photo: Petterik Wiggers/Oxfam

From early warning to early action in Somalia

More than three years after it was initiated in the aftermath of the 2011 famine, the early-warning, early-action trigger mechanism for Somalia remains a work in progress. This paper looks at how the mechanism has functioned during the 2016/7 drought crisis response.

Aminata Jalloh, 26, Cash Grant Farmer- Katumbo (near Kabala Town). Photo: Tommy Trenchard/Oxfam

Transparency is more than dollars and cents

Transparency in international aid is not just about fulfilling a requirement based on people’s right to access information, but also about making aid more effective. Based on interviews conducted in Sierra Leone and Liberia, this research looks at the information needed by in-country development stakeholders with an emphasis on accountability actors.

Raising the bar: rethinking the role of business in the Sustainable Development Goals

The 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development gives business a significant role to play in efforts to achieve the Sustainable Development Goals, based on its ability to invest and innovate. This paper explores ways in which companies can provide more meaningful contributions to governments’ commitments to reach the SDGs.

An increase in agribusiness investments poses serious risks to the livelihoods of small-scale farmers and others dependent on land.

Whose crops, at what price? Agricultural investment in Myanmar

After years of international isolation, Myanmar is liberalizing its economy and seeking to attract foreign investment. This paper outlines potential risks to communities posed by these investments, and explores state regulation as a way to promote responsible business practices in the sector.

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